In tune with PM Narendra Modi’s can-do business spirit, Environment Ministry set to tweak rules

In a new order, the Environment Ministry will soon replace the existing 2011 notification of the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) that manages all activities taking place on the coastline of India.

coast-pti

In a new order, the Environment Ministry under Prime Minister Narendra Modi will soon replace the existing 2011 notification of the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) that manages all activities taking place on the coastline of India. The new order that will soon be implemented by the government will be called Marine and Coastal Regulation Zone (MCRZ) notification, according to report in the Indian Express. This move of the government comes with an aim to make important changes in the way it governs the coast and also to remove the ban on reclamation of land all over the coast line including the ecologically sensitive areas along the shores and to use it for others grounds like commercial, entertainment and even for tourism activities.Read More »

A sea change

Drastic changes to coastal governance rules do not adequately address livelihood and ecological concerns

The government is planning to bring in changes to the way the country’s coasts are governed. A draft Marine and Coastal Regulation Zone (MCRZ) notification is reportedly in the offing. The last Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) Rules were notified in 2011. There have been significant changes in land-use along the coast since the CRZ 2011 was notified and it has been argued that a strict implementation of the 2011 rules has led to a neglect of development in coastal areas, particularly in Karnataka, Goa and Kerala. The draft tries to open up coastal areas to development activities, but it does so in a manner that invites accusations that it wavers on its fundamental mandate of protecting coastal ecology and securing the livelihoods of people who depend on marine ecosystems.

The draft proposes to remove the ban on reclamation of land in coastal areas for commercial or tourism activities even in ecologically-sensitive areas. In doing so, it does not adequately acknowledge the idiosyncrasies of coastal areas. Sand dunes, for example, are natural bulwarks against strong sea winds and high waters. Mangroves, the tiny forests along the coastlines, cushion the impact of tidal waves. Flattening them in order to construct tourism infrastructure compromises the coast’s resilience to natural calamities. The new rules continue a trend that began in 2015 with a series amendments to the CRZ 2011. An amendment that year, for example, allowed reclamation of the seabed for constructing roads. Another amendment, last year, allowed commercial establishments like the shacks in Goa to remain erected during the monsoon months.

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