CRZ Plan Should Consider Sea Level Rise: Fishers, Environmentalists urge GoTN

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Prepared in 2012, the SAC’s report predicts that for a 1 m sea level rise by 2100, sq.km of state highway, 85.66 km of railway infrastructure, 497.65 sq.km of cropland and 826 sq.km of aquifers will be submerged or degraded by tidal action. Another document – “Future Sea Level Rise: Assessment of Loss and Damage in 2015” – prepared for the State Planning Commission predicts that in Chennai alone, 10 lakh people and 144 sq.km of land are in danger of submergence due to SLR by 2050.

While the SAC’s report has been quietly filed away, the State Planning Commission’s report on Chennai has not been published despite its public importance.

As per the submergence maps contained in the SAC’s report, Chennai stands to lose 3.11 sq. km of critical industrial infrastructure, almost all in the Ennore region. NTECL Vallur, all of TANGEDCO’s power plants in Ennore, Kamarajar Port’s existing and proposed infrastructure inside the Creek, HPCL and BPCL’s oil terminals, the Minjur desalination plant and portions of CPCL’s petrochemical refinery in Manali will be swallowed by the sea. The groundwater resources of Araniyar-Kosasthalaiyar basin will be degraded due to tidal ingress. The entire IT corridor will be affected by sea level rise and most of the newly developed areas in Pallikaranai marshlands will be submerged under an advancing sea.

Industries and settlements in low-lying areas – such as the proposed 4000 MW Cheyyur plant and existing nuclear complex in Kalpakkam, the existing IL&FS plant and proposed petroleum refinery and Petrochemical Investment Region in Cuddalore and Nagapattinam, industrial installations and salt pans in Tuticorin and the Koodankulam nuclear reactors are located in vulnerable areas that are prone either to submergence or degradation due to tidal action.

“Climate change and sea level rise are real and present dangers. The CZMP offers an opportunity to plan for the decongesting of the coast. Other countries are doing that. We must start retreating from the sea and improving our natural safeguards against extreme sea-borne events,” said Pooja Kumar of Coastal Resource Centre.

Saravanan, whose village Urur Kuppam is already witnessing erosion, says “The CZMP should include a long-term housing plan for coastal communities as we are being squeezed by a seaward moving city and a land-ward moving tide.”

For More Information, contact – Pooja Kumar – 9791122180

Organized by – The Coastal Resource Centre, 92, 3rd Cross Street, Thiruvalluvar Nagar, Besant Nagar, Chennai 600090

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Forest dept wakes up, stays illegal construction near Pulicat

CHENNAI: Cracking the whip on rampant illegal constructions at the ecologically-sensitive Pulicat, the State forest department stayed a mega residential project that proposed to construct rows of villas on the sea front of the lake.

The action came following a series of reports in Express, including one on July 28 that detailed the real estate developments in the area, including the under-construction township coming up within the Pulicat sanctuary.K Geethanjali, wildlife warden, Chennai, told Express that a team has been sent to probe the allegation that construction was taking place within the Pulicat sanctuary boundaries.

“About 13 villages under local panchayat limits are part of Pulicat sanctuary, which is a no-development zone. Traditional fishermen in the area can carry out bona fide activities, but building permanent structures for commercial activities is prohibited. We issued notices and works have been stopped,” the official said.Read More »

Boat Club, Poes Garden not spared from pollution: Report

Pushing industries to the city fringes doesn’t help, say activists

If you think that posh residential neighbourhoods such as Boat Club and Poes Garden have lesser pollution levels due to their tree cover, you are mistaken. These areas have recorded high levels of particulate matter that are lesser than 2.5 microns.

Boat Club recorded 104.30 micrograms/cubic metre and Poes Garden 101 micrograms/cubic metre during a 24-hour period last month. According to Central Pollution Control Board standards, anything above 90 micrograms/cubic metre is classified as unhealthy for sensitive groups. The permissible level for 24-hours is 60 microgram/cubic metre.

Members of civil society, residents of north Chennai and doctors, who addressed the media on Wednesday called for putting a stop to air pollution from industries, especially from coal-fired thermal power plants in the north of the city. They also demanded adherence to national standards and no further expansion of high polluting industries in the area.

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Press Release: Scientific Body’s High Tide Line for TN Wrongly Drawn to Create Real Estate: Coastal Activists

Chennai: Nearly 900 acres of tidal wetlands in two locations have been wrongly identified as land by the National Centre for Sustainable Coastal Management (NCSCM) which got a multi-crore contract to demarcate the High Tide Line for Tamil Nadu under the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) Notification, 2011. This and other inconsistencies were revealed during a ground truthing exercise conducted by the Coastal Resource Centre (CRC). The erroneous demarcation shortchanges fisherfolk by showing tidal waterbodies as developable real estate.

The inconsistencies cast a shadow on NCSCM’s demarcation exercise and the robustness of the verification process by the State and Central Coastal Zone Management Agencies, CRC said. NCSCM’s High Tide Line cannot be relied upon for preparing the State Coastal Zone Management Plans.

NCSCM had denied access to these maps under RTI claiming that disclosure would prejudicially affect their scientific and economic interests. The maps were later accessed through the State Coastal Zone Management Authority.

“Public scrutiny of such foundation data sets is critical as this forms the basis of the CZMP.   An inaccurate HTL can result in a flawed CZMP, and throw open ecologically sensitive areas for development,” said Pooja Kumar of the Coastal Resource Centre.

CRC ground-truthed the HTL data set by zeroing in on locations where prima facie discrepancies were evident.

  • In Karungali, Thiruvallur District, and Yedaiyanthittu Kazhuveli in Kanchipuram/Villupuram districts, the HTL is demarcated within the tidal waterbody thereby reducing the area of water protected by the CRZ Notification. By doing this, nearly 888 acres of new developable real estate has been created in these two locations.

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  • The HTL on one arm of the Adyar River was highlighted to show how man-made structures on the river were arbitrarily used to mark the extent of tidal influence. the CRZ limits of Adyar creek stops with the first causeway that the river’s backwaters pass on north of the river mouth.

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  • In Athipattu village on Ennore Creek, NCSCM effectively obliterates all evidence of CRZ violation by Hindustan Petroleum (HP). HP has illegally built on a mangrove-fringed tidal creek (CRZ IV and CRZ I under CRZ Notification). By failing to ground-truth or compare it against an earlier, more robust HTL demarcation by the Institute of Remote Sensing, NCSCM’s HTL wrongly uses HP’s violation as the baseline.

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Thousands of fisherfolk along the coast of India are facing threats to livelihood and living spaces from various sectors targeting the coast. A robust plan to manage such a contested space is needed to secure the lives and livelihoods of artisanal fishers and protect ecologically sensitive areas. To achieve this, three action points are suggested

  • Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate change must immediately call for a complete scientific revalidation of the HTL prepared by NCSCM by conducting extensive ground truthing and community consultations
  • HTL prepared by NCSCM in this form must be declared invalid and instructions be passed to all states to pause using this data for preparation of CZMP
  • No project be considered for CRZ Clearance at the state and/or central level until the finalization of a Coastal Zone Management Plan following the guidelines issued in the CRZ 2011 using an accurate, validated HTL.

For More Information Contact :

Saravanan K – 9176331717

Pooja Kumar – 9791122180

In tune with PM Narendra Modi’s can-do business spirit, Environment Ministry set to tweak rules

In a new order, the Environment Ministry will soon replace the existing 2011 notification of the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) that manages all activities taking place on the coastline of India.

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In a new order, the Environment Ministry under Prime Minister Narendra Modi will soon replace the existing 2011 notification of the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) that manages all activities taking place on the coastline of India. The new order that will soon be implemented by the government will be called Marine and Coastal Regulation Zone (MCRZ) notification, according to report in the Indian Express. This move of the government comes with an aim to make important changes in the way it governs the coast and also to remove the ban on reclamation of land all over the coast line including the ecologically sensitive areas along the shores and to use it for others grounds like commercial, entertainment and even for tourism activities.Read More »

Oil pollution threatens Chennai’s beaches

Morning walkers shocked to find oil on the sands of the Marina at Nochikuppam, Pattinapakkam; fishermen demand immediate action

Sunday’s oil spill as a result of the collision of two cargo ships off the Kamarajar Port in Ennore has been polluting Chennai’s beaches too.

On Monday morning beach walkers found oil on the sands on the Marina beach, near INS Adyar, at Nochikuppam and at Pattinapakkam.

Anusya Parasuraman, a resident of Nochikuppam and regular morning walker, said that she was shocked to see the black oil deposit on the sands of the Marina. “In many places people were playing in the water despite the blackish oil floating around. Several fishermen from Nochikuppam, who landed their boats after fishing trips, said there was a strong smell of oil in the sea,” she said.

Various fishermen organisations have demanded immediate action to remove the oil spills as it is affecting the livelihood of the fishermen.

M.D. Dayalan of the Indian Fishermen’s Association said the oil would affect the sea for years to come. “Fishermen have not been able to venture into the sea for the past two days,” he pointed out.

K. Bharathi of the South Indian Fishermen Welfare Association said the leak had proved that the port had no safety mechanisms in place to prevent such pollution. “They only want ports to flourish but not us fishermen,” he said.

Nanjil Ravi of Akila Indhiya Meenavar Sangam said efforts must be taken to contain the spill, which is fast spreading. “More and more fishing hamlets are getting affected by this oil spill.”

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